Millennial quit job, moved into bus, makes money as voiceover artist

Date:

Share post:


When Alice Everdeen started freelancing as a voiceover artist in March 2020, she worked under a laundry basket lined with a mattress topper.

The contraption, meant to block out sound, worked well enough: In her first full month on freelance services platform Fiverr, her side hustle made $3,500, Everdeen says. That’s what she made monthly in her full-time job as a content manager at a dietary supplement company in Austin, Texas, she adds.

“I’d get home from work and maybe work four hours every night,” Everdeen, 31, tells CNBC Make It. “I was able to work less and make the same amount.”

Everdeen says advertising agencies gravitated to her voice, which she describes as “warm” and “inviting.” Her next four months of freelance work continued to match her full-time job’s income — so she decided to quit and pursue voiceover work more fully in July 2020.

In her first month of full-time voiceover work, Everdeen booked 41 projects. In July 2022, she completed 181, and now makes up to $15,000 per month on the platform, according to documents reviewed by CNBC Make It.

She records for companies like Amazon, Southwest Airlines and OnlyFans — and only works three to five hours per day, she says. Last year, she earned more than $102,000 in total income.

Her earnings have largely gone toward renovating a new office: a refurbished school bus that Everdeen and her boyfriend bought for $7,500 at a local auction to fulfill their dream of traveling of traveling the country.

From behind a desk to inside a laundry basket

Everdeen’s first voiceover gig wasn’t planned. In 2018, she was working for an advertising agency that wrote an ad script for a local Austin car dealership. She read the ad aloud to the owners, who decided they didn’t want to hire an actor for the official recording: They liked Everdeen’s voice.

She recorded 10 voiceovers for the ad agency, and leaned on that experience when she joined Fiverr. The freelance side gig was only meant to help Everdeen earn extra cash while renovating the bus.

“I didn’t expect to make more than a couple hundred dollars per month,” she says. “But in April [2020], I had a ‘holy s—‘ moment. I was matching my take-home income.”

Everdeen and her boyfriend are moving into a refurbished school bus to tour the U.S. in September. On the bus, Everdeen will have a portable ISO box to record in. 

Alice Everdeen

It took Everdeen a couple of months to become comfortable recording voiceovers full-time, she says. She was competing directly against seasoned actors who voiced popular cartoon characters, and as impostor syndrome set in, she sought out voice coaches who charged roughly $150 per hour to teach her voiceover basics.

Their advice actually lost Everdeen business: After she started taking lessons, she booked fewer projects and was told she sounded “too robotic,” she says.

She reverted to her natural conversational style and business came roaring back. With practice came confidence and efficiency: She says she can now record a 30-second spot in three minutes, down from 20 minutes.

“I can take on a lot more work in the same amount of time,” Everdeen says.

Onto a school bus

Everdeen and her boyfriend have spent the last two and a half years renovating their 156-square-foot school bus — an $80,000 project largely funded by her voiceover income. Her boyfriend, a tradesman with expertise in water irrigation, has been primarily responsible for building out the inside of the bus.

She says they didn’t want to spend the rest of their lives behind desks, and bought the bus because it was larger than a van and easier to customize than an RV. “We feel like we’ve made it as adults by our standards,” Everdeen says. “We want to follow our dreams rather than we’re told we should do.”

The renovations will be complete on September 5, Everdeen says — meaning she’ll soon be able to work inside the bus in her pajamas from anywhere in the country. Fiverr does all her advertising for her, so she doesn’t have to spending time sourcing clients or auditioning for gigs.

The trade-off: The platform takes 20% from every order. Competing platforms like Upwork charge a smaller percentage for projects priced over $500. Everdeen says she doesn’t mind the fee, which is one example of many unexpected lessons she’s had to learn since taking on her new gig.

“I went into this so blind — I didn’t realize I was becoming a business owner,” she says. “I wasn’t only the CEO, I was the head of marketing, I’m the head of HR.”

The bus took about two and a half years to renovate. Everdeen says the couple opted for a school bus because “vans are too damn small.”

Alice Everdeen



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Related articles

A Passport for the Global Tech Ecosystem

The launch of the Romanian chapter of Endeavor was celebrated last week at The Bucharest Diplomatic Club,...

What you need to know about investing in stocks and bonds

Stocks and bonds are two types of investment to be considered as part of any portfolio. SUPPLIED Stocks...

Asian Stocks Tumble on Fed Jitters, Recession Risks By Investing.com

© Reuters. By Ambar Warrick Investing.com-- Asian stock markets slumped on Wednesday as hawkish comments from Federal...

Private Lenders Or Banks?| Bankrate

When evaluating personal loan lenders, you can choose from traditional banks and private online lenders. Bank lenders...